Late Turner, the Tate Britain and London

On Wednesday 26th November, students taking the module Introduction to the Arts in Britain through English visited Tate Britain in London. While not a new destination it has been a while since we last visited.

Photo: I Preston

Photo: I Preston

We went to look at paintings by Turner at an exhibition called Late Turner – Paintings Set Free. These were works produced in the last 16 years of the artist’s life, a period described as “an extraordinary creative flowering”.

Photo: I Preston

Photo: I Preston

The exhibition featured paintings of Venice, watercolours and sketches from his tours in Europe, and many marine paintings. We were pleased to see The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons (1835), a painting we had looked at closely in class.

Burning House of Lords and Commons

Burning House of Lords and Commons

The trip was an opportunity to see other art works in Tate Britain’s collection. We looked at some paintings by Constable, who, along with Turner, was the major British landscape painter of the 19th century.

Photo: I Preston

Photo: I Preston

We were also able to see some paintings by the Pre-Raphaelites, following class input on Monday.

Photo: I Preston

Photo: I Preston

Later in the day, we walked from Tate Britain along the river to Waterloo. It was a good opportunity to see The Houses of Parliament, Whitehall – including the Cenotaph still with wreaths from Remembrance Day, and Trafalgar Square. We got some good views of London in the mist from the Golden Jubilee Bridge.

Photo: I Preston

Photo: I Preston

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Ten and a half tips for exams.

We’re heading towards the end of semester. Here’s another post from the vault. Some tips for the exam… yes any exam. 🙂

ELTSU Winchester

Boo!

Ok that might be the only word in the English Language scarier than ‘exam’. But, we are in exam season and no matter how you feel about them exams can be frightening and stressful for many if not most.

Creative Commons. Albeto G https://www.flickr.com/photos/albertogp123/5843577306/ Creative Commons Alberto G https://www.flickr.com/photos/albertogp123/5843577306/

The word ‘exam’ is an example of what linguists call a clipping, it is a short form of examination. Other clippings include ‘bro’ for ‘brother’ and ‘telly’ for ‘television’. The reason I find this interesting is that clippings tend to be more common in informal, casual or friendly contexts, not what most people would associate with an exam.

Here’s a few ideas about how to make sure you do as well as you can on the exams.

1 – Get enough sleep; plenty of sleep is even better. More and more exams require higher level thinking and reasoning, and this is nearly impossible to do…

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What is “good”? What is “good enough”?

It’s nearly the end of semester; here are some thoughts on reaching the right/next grade band.

ELTSU Winchester

This morning I bumped into the University of WinchesterStudent Union’s incoming International Students Officer. We talked about marks and how grades are measured and perceived differently in different educational contexts. This made me think about a question that comes up time and again; “how do you know when something is good; can you tell if it is good enough?”

The first assignment I got back at my first UK University was a bit of a disappointment, 62% both my prior Universities 60% was a pass. I was happy I didn’t have to resubmit, but I had thought the work was better than only just passing. I was learning a lot from the course and that was my main motivation but I felt I’d applied my learning better than that.

In the UK at undergraduate levels 40% is the standard pass mark. I found this out while about 2…

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